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What is your creative process like? What happens before sitting down to write?
 
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It's not really a process per se. I write when I feel like writing, and don't when I don't. I don't know if it has something to do with my biorythms, my diet, sleep deprivation; in any case, I sometimes get an idea for a story or an article and it eats at me until I get it down. So, I just sit down and do it. 


Time to write is precious, so I like a bath, a brandy, and a smoke, scratching out words butt naked. I usually have an idea where I want to go when I get in the water. 


my creative process is simple, i make sure i have an hour or two all to myself, i sit down with something to drink and i just go for it. before i sit down to work, i mentally choose what i would like to learn on, then begin brain storming ideas. 


Since my writing is mostly non-fiction, the first step, once inspired about a topic , is gathering and sorting information. Then I organize an outline of chapter topics, and sit down to work. 


My creative process is alot of rewriting. I try to just start typing even if what I'm getting isn't very good. Once I hit a stride I go back and rewrite everything. 


My creative process is always the same...think, dream, jot down ideas and lots of trees are used in the process. 


I do a lot of free writing and journal entries. Some of my thoughts come through my dreams and mostly after meditations. I am able to hear clearly as if there is a whisper directly into my ear. Thoughts develop when I go out into nature for a leisure walk. 


Someone once said that the best way to write is to try not to write. As it starts to percolate underneath--something I'm at odds with, some unfinished business, characters that take on a life of their own, a place or setting that begins to have some pull on my imagination--I begin to jot things down on the computer. Usually a sketchy opening chapter or two. But then again, I soon discover I need to do more research: reading up on, say, the current socio/political climate in Mississippi; going over my notes, photos I took, people I talked to, trips I took, tapes of interviews I made, until it deepens my foundation and leads me back to the opening scenes and feeds a growing storyline and quest. Which, in turn, seems to send me back to writing to discover what the characters will say or do as the story seems to be taking on a life of its own. If I know exactly where the story is going, there is no sense of discovery and the energy fades. In a sense, its all synchronistic, links are made I never thought of and I'm off and running again. I also find it helpful to stop at a certain point so that when I take the writing up again, its fed by that irrepressible energy from the day before. 


I research a subject on paper and the internet, then call up people who know their cookies and ask them. 


I build the world, including charts, maps, etc. if necessary. I'll do research. Then I create the characters with their conflicts and motivations. 


Everything of importance that occurs throughout the day I remember to write about exactly that way later, which is why I won't write about it. That's not creativity or genius, it's repetition and slavery. I therefore mix a drink and go out into the world and write about it sober later or I do the opposite, living it, mixing it, and then writing about it. I try to write perfectly like the authors I respect and hope to land above the ones I don't. 


When that germ of a story starts, I let it fester in my head, going forward and backward from whatever started it. Once I have the beginning, middle, and ending formulated, then I start putting it down on paper. The details come as the pen moves. 


I just simply sit down by myself and just let it flow, let it hemorrage. I hardly edit or change anything as im writing. And when I am done, I just hand it over to someone and let him or her do the editing. Nothing happens before sitting down to write, I just simply sit down and begin writing. 


Lots of images are swirling around in my mind and when I try to capture them, the actual writing turns out quite differently. Who knows what really goes on in our minds. When I wrote for a newspaper, a weekly column, the stress of deadline made my fingers operate well ahead of my brain. So revision of thoughts on paper became the modus operandi. 


I see the action and hear the dialogue in my head as a film, seeing real characters and imagining what they's say and do, it plays out in the cinema in my head 



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