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What did you first read? How did you begin to write? Who were the first to read what you wrote?
 
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Good question. In school, like first grade. A story about a leaf that held on to the tree last. Forgot the name. But at the end of the book, the leaf let go. It had too, it was the season. It made me sad. So sad for the little leaf. I would take my sisters typewriter and punch away, then ask her if I wrote any words. She would tell me 'almost' every time. Teachers were the first to read what I wrote. Sometimes right in front of the whole class. 


The first book of meaning that I can remember was "A Wind In the Willows" by Madelaine L'engle. I have read all of her work and as an adult read her memoir. What a gift to be invited into the soul of another human being!

I began writing as a 6-year old by rhyming and asking my mother to help me spell words. My father helped me to stay in the lines...and voila-a poet was born!

My parents were always the first to read my writings. My mother demanded rigorous consistency and my father expected near perfection! I do not turn in any work today without at least 10 edits and a few thumbs up from others.
 


I started to write in 2000, when I decided to write a book describing our family history and escapades. The book was intended for my children. They were too young when we immigrated to the United States and I realized that they do not remember many things correctly.
My husband and my friends were my first readers.
 


My first books to read were about dogs in general. I needed to write articles for my training clients; after I left they had alot of questions about what we had learned so it helped to answer those. My clients were the first to read my work. 


My early ventures into reading began with the works of Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, Charles Johnson, W.E.B. DuBois, and others. I was a good enough writer in college that I was able to tutor others in college composition writing before I was barely a junior myself. I submitted my writing to poetry anthologies, the ERIC Research Database, etc. 


I started with McGuffey Readers, then picture books about space and flowers. I started reading when I was four years old. I did not have an interest in writing until I was in fifth grade, when I started sketching scenarios for books. I did not actually start writing a full length novel until I was in high school. During my youth I had other ambitions which were never realized. During high school I was introduced to fandom by attending my first science fiction convention where I met many authors and artists in the genre, and I read many of the classics by Wells, Verne, Asimov, Heinlein, Herbert, Silverberg, Saberhagen, Niven, Pournelle, and so on. These authors in turn inspired me to try my hand at writing my own fiction. But at the time I was too shy to present anything yet. I did write a pre-Indiana Jones adventure novel called "Escape to Samarra", and sent it to several publishers, but all I got were rejection letters. One was polite and the editor told me to keep writing no matter what. They just did not publish in my genre, he said. 


I was thirteen years old when I first began writing, my work were all poems. My brother who is only 10 years old is always the first person to read my work and flatter them. I usually start writing when no one is home because the house is much quieter and I get to focus on my work better (lol) 


The first book I read which made an impression on me was Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man when I was going through the same growing pains as the protagonist. It made me feel I was not alone in finding myself. Quite a relief! I was ordered to write stories and poetry in high school. The first voluntary writing of mine was short stories on themes which were prompted by incidents in my daily life. My coworkers and friends were the first to read my writing and provided inspiration to keep writing. 


My first "big" book reading (as opposed to Dr.Seuss, etc.) were the Penrod stories by Booth Tarkington then I went on to the Dr. Doolittle series by Hugh Lofting. I first started writing at the behest of my 8th grade teacher, Mr. Rosen. He was the first person who actually read my work. Oddly enough, it was comedy. 


I've been reading everything from the Sunday funnies and Dr. Seuss, to package labels, textbooks and novels, since I was very young. I wrote my first story when I was 12 years old, to entertain my baby sister and her friends. 


I began reading in the first grade at the age of eight. I began to write soon after.
My sister and mother read my early attempts at a family newsletter. The first article was about a giant pizza that invaded Manhattan and was finally stopped when it was caught at the top of the Empire State Building.
 


When I was younger I read The Hardy brothers. At the age 25 I started write scene plays with my brother Rodney. My father was the first to read my writings. 


I've always been fascinated with those who can portray wit and subtle humor through written word. I can't for the life of me remember what I 'first' read, but I'm a huge fan of Augusten Burroughs and Terry McMillan.
I began writing poetry as early as 14. I have always been a very creative person and seem to rotate between my many talents, whether it be writing poetry, plays, or short stories, or my other creative outlets such as painting, drawing, and acting.
I believe the first to read something I had written was my sixth grade teacher, who then called my mom because she thought I may be going through something due to my deep expression through a poem and incorporated artwork. (lol)
 


The first thing I read was romance novels for sure. I started writing romance novels and short stories six years ago. My friends were the first to read my stories, and from there after I promoted my book I received good reviews and some criticism. Let me be frank here you canít keep everyone happy LOL. I donít mind criticism, thatís what authors face everyday and learn a lot from it. But I do mind the ones that are personal meant to attack you, and not to analyze your writing and bring useful points to improve the piece, or bring its jewels out. 


"In them (the books I read in my youth), I learned of the many types of sieges against the spirit of man, and indomitable rise above that siege through that spirit in man, whether in life, or through death." Jon C. Randall
http://www.joshcomm.org/misc/quotes.html

"I got lost in these books, intensely becoming a part of the story I was reading, my whole total concentration absorbed in them. I read often. From Homer to Einstein; William L. Shirer; Exodus and Warsaw; Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone; The Alamo; or George Armstrong Custer; there was nothing I didn't want to, or couldn't read."
http://www.joshcomm.org/shortstories/bastard.html

During my late teens, I started writing poetry, and when I went to war in Vietnam, wrote even more. I sent them to everyone that was involved in my life at that time, from my foster parents to the few girlfriends I had at that time.
 



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